Composed

Neil Rosenberg is the writer of four songs and tunes published through SOCAN:

  • “Queenstown”
  • “Penniless (But Not Baroque)”
  • “Farewell Cindy”
  • “Laughin’ And Scratchin’”

Early Influences

  • Pete Seeger
  • L. Mayne Smith
  • Billy Faier
  • New Lost City Ramblers
  • Earl Scruggs
  • Ralph Stanley
  • Eddie Adcock

Performed With

  • Lorain County String Band, 1959
  • Plum Creek Boys, 1960-1961
  • Redwood Canyon Ramblers, 1959-1960, 1963
  • Shorty & Juanita Shehan, 1961
  • Pigeon Hill Boys/Ramblers, 1961-1967
  • Stoney Lonesome Boys, 1963-1968
  • Peter Aceves (Narváez), 1967-1976
  • Country Dream, 1971
  • Sneed Hearn and the Smiling Liberators, 1971-1972
  • Crooked Stovepipe, 1973-present
  • Black Auks, 1994-present

Led the Way

  • Performed (opened for the Osborne Brothers) at the first college bluegrass concert in history, 1960.
  • Wrote one of the first scholarly papers on bluegrass music, 1966.
  • Authored four books, notes to approximately 50 albums and CDs, and 60 articles and review essays in a variety of publications, 1967-present.
  • Helped introduce bluegrass to Atlantic Canada, 1968-present.
  • Inaugurated “30 Years Ago” column in Bluegrass Unlimited, 1981-1994.
  • Authored the definitive book-length history of bluegrass, 1985.
  • IBMA Distinguished Achievement Award, 1986.
  • Grammy Award for Best Album Notes for Anthology of American Folk Music, 1997.
  • At-large member of IBMA’s board of directors, 2006-2012.
  • First international inductee to the Bluegrass Hall of Fame, 2014.

By the Way

  • Played in the first Bay Area bluegrass band, Berkeley, California, 1959.
  • President of Oberlin College Folk Song Club, 1960-1961.
  • Filled in occasionally as a banjo player for Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys.
  • Managed Bill Monroe’s Brown County Jamboree Park in Bean Blossom, IN, 1963.
  • Holds dual citizenship in the United States and Canada.

Composed

Neil Rosenberg is the writer of four songs and tunes published through SOCAN:

  • “Queenstown”
  • “Penniless (But Not Baroque)”
  • “Farewell Cindy”
  • “Laughin’ And Scratchin’”

Early Influences

  • Pete Seeger
  • L. Mayne Smith
  • Billy Faier
  • New Lost City Ramblers
  • Earl Scruggs
  • Ralph Stanley
  • Eddie Adcock

Performed With

  • Lorain County String Band, 1959
  • Plum Creek Boys, 1960-1961
  • Redwood Canyon Ramblers, 1959-1960, 1963
  • Shorty & Juanita Shehan, 1961
  • Pigeon Hill Boys/Ramblers, 1961-1967
  • Stoney Lonesome Boys, 1963-1968
  • Peter Aceves (Narváez), 1967-1976
  • Country Dream, 1971
  • Sneed Hearn and the Smiling Liberators, 1971-1972
  • Crooked Stovepipe, 1973-present
  • Black Auks, 1994-present

Led the Way

  • Performed (opened for the Osborne Brothers) at the first college bluegrass concert in history, 1960.
  • Wrote one of the first scholarly papers on bluegrass music, 1966.
  • Authored four books, notes to approximately 50 albums and CDs, and 60 articles and review essays in a variety of publications, 1967-present.
  • Helped introduce bluegrass to Atlantic Canada, 1968-present.
  • Inaugurated “30 Years Ago” column in Bluegrass Unlimited, 1981-1994.
  • Authored the definitive book-length history of bluegrass, 1985.
  • IBMA Distinguished Achievement Award, 1986.
  • Grammy Award for Best Album Notes for Anthology of American Folk Music, 1997.
  • At-large member of IBMA’s board of directors, 2006-2012.
  • First international inductee to the Bluegrass Hall of Fame, 2014.

By the Way

  • Played in the first Bay Area bluegrass band, Berkeley, California, 1959.
  • President of Oberlin College Folk Song Club, 1960-1961.
  • Filled in occasionally as a banjo player for Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys.
  • Managed Bill Monroe’s Brown County Jamboree Park in Bean Blossom, IN, 1963.
  • Holds dual citizenship in the United States and Canada.

From the Archives

“I’d realized when playing with Bill [Monroe] that I didn’t know the repertoire, so I got into discography as a way of figuring out who did what when.”
Quoted by Boris Weintraub in “Neil V. Rosenberg: The Scholar Who Played With Bill Monroe,” Bluegrass Unlimited, April 2008.
“Since 1969 I’ve written album notes for about forty LPs or CDs, and this kind of writing that links sound to print is my favorite medium. I’m particularly proud of having won a Grammy for my contribution to Smithsonian/Folkways’ reissue of Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music.”
Quoted in “George Lyon talks to Neil Rosenberg,” The Canadian Folk Music Bulletin, May 2001.
“Perhaps it’s only a question of historical detail, but my personal feeling is that the person or persons who started calling their favorite hillbilly music ‘bluegrass’ really gave the musical style a life of its own because they gave it a name.”
Neil Rosenberg, “Into Bluegrass: The History of a Word,” Muleskinner News, August 1974.
close